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Roz Chast in The New Yorker

Roz Chast in The New Yorker

by Adam Gopnik

Dec. 30, 2019

Certain comic artists carry an aura that makes everything around them look like their work. In the company of Saul Steinberg, a simple Italian restaurant on Sullivan Street could feel as gravely melancholy and precisely ordered as one of his drawings, while a day spent with Bruce McCall has a hallucinatory atmosphere in which everything in Manhattan seems to have been transplanted from a midsize Canadian city in the nineteen-fifties—to the point that he seems able to find parking spaces at will, as if carrying them in his Torontonian pocket. So when the cartoonist and graphic storyteller Roz Chast invites a friend to dinner near her West Side pied-à-terre, where she escapes from her staider, greener Connecticut life, the Turkish restaurant she chooses inevitably turns out to be the most purely Chastian locale in New York...

Roz Chast at SVA Chelsea Gallery

Roz Chast at SVA Chelsea Gallery

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 2018

Roz Chast at Moore College of Art and Design, Graham Gallery

Roz Chast at Moore College of Art and Design, Graham Gallery

Roz Chast and Deborah Willis: Visionary Women

August 18 – November 3, 2018

Roz Chast's new book "Going Into Town"

Roz Chast's new book "Going Into Town"

author interview on Fresh Air, NPR, Oct 2, 2017, but Terry Gross

Oct. 2017

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast is a city person. She grew up in an apartment building in Brooklyn, N.Y., and though she moved to the suburbs as an adult when she was pregnant with her second child, she never stopped loving the grit and excitement of New York City.

"Just about every street in Manhattan has that kind of density of visual information," she says. "It's just fun. I like looking at it. Everything seems to suggest stories."

Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs at the Museum of the City of New York

Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs at the Museum of the City of New York

April 14 - October 9, 2016

Roz Chast on Italian Renaissance Painting for the Met Artist Project

Roz Chast on Italian Renaissance Painting for the Met Artist Project

Review of Roz Chast at the Norman Rockwell Museum

Review of Roz Chast at the Norman Rockwell Museum

STOCKBRIDGE — Roz Chast’s cartoons, the subject of a terrific summer show at the Norman Rockwell Museum, are about everything that’s incommensurable in life. They try to equate, on the one hand, this, this, that, these (how many do you want?), oh and that, too, take your pick; and on the other, splat. Sound of escaping air. Nothing.

How I love them.

Roz Chast wins the 2015 Reubens Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year

Roz Chast wins the 2015 Reubens Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year

On Saturday night, in a ballroom holding hundreds of top cartoonists, the organizers might as well have piped in Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Off,” because for only the third time in the event’s six-decade-plus history, a woman — the New Yorker’s Roz Chast — received the group’s big honor, the Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year. And her trophy capped what may well be the event’s winningest night ever for female writers and artists, as six women won in the 16 competitive categories.  

Inside the Studio of Roz Chast

Inside the Studio of Roz Chast

Roz Chast published her first cartoon in The New Yorker in 1978; since then, she's had more than one thousand two hundred and seventy run in the magazine. On a blisteringly cold, recent winter morning, we rode the train to Connecticut and stepped inside her colorful and cartoon-filled home

Roz Chast SHORT-listed for National Book Award

Roz Chast SHORT-listed for National Book Award

10/15/14

Roz Chast, “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?,” Bloomsbury

In her graphic memoir, Ms. Chast, a cartoonist for The New Yorker, details her parents’ final years and their struggles with dementia, illness and financial instability. “No one has perfect parents and no one can write a perfect book about her relationship to them. But Chast has come close,” Alex Witchel wrote in a review in The New York Times.