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Roz Chast

Something More Pleasant

March 20 - April 18, 2015

Roz Chast, Hello, 2015

Roz Chast

Hello, 2015

hand-hooked rug, wool, burlap

23 x 20 inches

 

Roz Chast, Carrots and Peas, 2013

Roz Chast

Carrots and Peas, 2013

hand-hooked rug, wool, burlap

20 x 24 inches

 

Roz Chast, Dad's Favorite Foods, 2014

Roz Chast

Dad's Favorite Foods, 2014

hand-hooked rug, wool, burlap

51 x 36.5 inches

Roz Chast, Infinity Mirror Cover, published Mar. 4, 2013

Roz Chast

Infinity Mirror Cover, published Mar. 4, 2013

watercolor and ink on paper

10 x 8 inches

 

Roz Chast, Library Cover, published Oct. 18, 2010

Roz Chast

Library Cover, published Oct. 18, 2010

watercolor and ink on paper

10 x 8 inches

 

Roz Chast, The Little Engine That Coulda, 2014

Roz Chast

The Little Engine That Coulda, 2014

ink on paper

image: 9 x 8 inches

 

Roz Chast, Three Hysterically Blind Mice, October 11, 2004

Roz Chast

Three Hysterically Blind Mice, October 11, 2004

ink on paper

image: 9 x 8 inches

 

Roz Chast, Urban Trail Mix, published September 13, 2010

Roz Chast

Urban Trail Mix, published September 13, 2010

ink on paper

image: 7 x 7.25 inches

 

Roz Chast, The Procrastinatorium, 

Roz Chast

The Procrastinatorium, 

ink on paper

image: 9 x 8 inches

Roz Chast, Hypochondria House, published December 24, 2007

Roz Chast

Hypochondria House, published December 24, 2007

ink on paper

image: 8.5 x 8 inches

 

Roz Chast, A heart to heart talk, 2007

Roz Chast

A heart to heart talk, 2007

pen and ink on paper

image: 8.5 x 7 inches

 

Roz Chast, Snowmen In Denial, published March 5, 2012

Roz Chast

Snowmen In Denial, published March 5, 2012

ink on paper

image: 8.5 x 8 inches

 

Roz Chast, How Grandma Sees the Remote, published February 11, 2008

Roz Chast

How Grandma Sees the Remote, published February 11, 2008

ink on paper

image: 10 x 7 inches

 

Roz Chast, Egg #77, 2010-2013

Roz Chast

Egg #77, 2010-2013

eggshell. dye and polyurethane

2 1/4 x 1 5/8 inches

Roz Chast, Egg #74, 2010-2013

Roz Chast

Egg #74, 2010-2013

eggshell. dye and polyurethane

2 1/4 x 1 5/8 inches

left to right

left to right
Egg #86, 2010-2013, Egg #90, 2010-2013, Egg #87, 2010-2013, 
Egg #69, 2010-2013, Egg #73, 2010-2013, Egg #72, 2010-2013

 

left to right:

left to right:
Egg #80, 2010-2013, Egg #78, 2010-2013, Egg #67, 2010-2013

Roz Chast

Installation View

Roz Chast

Installation View

Roz Chast

Installation View

Roz Chast

Installation View

Roz Chast

Installation View

Roz Chast

Installation View

Roz Chast

Installation View

Roz Chast

Installation View

Inside the Studio of Roz Chast

Inside the Studio of Roz Chast

Roz Chast published her first cartoon in The New Yorker in 1978; since then, she's had more than one thousand two hundred and seventy run in the magazine. On a blisteringly cold, recent winter morning, we rode the train to Connecticut and stepped inside her colorful and cartoon-filled home

Roz Chast SHORT-listed for National Book Award

Roz Chast SHORT-listed for National Book Award

10/15/14

Roz Chast, “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?,” Bloomsbury

In her graphic memoir, Ms. Chast, a cartoonist for The New Yorker, details her parents’ final years and their struggles with dementia, illness and financial instability. “No one has perfect parents and no one can write a perfect book about her relationship to them. But Chast has come close,” Alex Witchel wrote in a review in The New York Times.

Roz Chast Longlisted for National Book Award

Roz Chast Longlisted for National Book Award

09/17/2014

For the first time in its history, the National Book Foundation has named a cartoonist a contender for its nonfiction award.

Roz Chast, the longtime New Yorker magazine contributor, is one of 10 authors on the nonfiction longlist, the foundation announced this morning.

Chast, however, is the only woman on the list.

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New York Times, Review of Roz Chast's new book "Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?"

New York Times, Review of Roz Chast's new book "Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?"

by Michiko Kakutani

May 6, 2014

Roz Chast feels — and draws — our pain. Our neurotic worries and genuine fears, our mundane and existential anxieties, our daydreams, nightmares, insecurities and guilty regrets. Or, rather, she does such a funny, fluent job in her New Yorker cartoons of conveying the things that keep her up at night that many readers are convinced that she is somehow mapping their own inner lives.

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NPR, Interview with Roz Chast

NPR, Interview with Roz Chast

Why Bring Up Death When We Could Talk About 'Something More Pleasant'?

May 5, 2014

When people talk about extending the human lifespan to 120 it bothers Roz Chast. "That upsets me for a lot of reasons," she tells NPR's Melissa Block. "I feel like these are people who don't really know anybody over 95." The reality of old age, she says, is that "people are not in good shape, and everything is falling apart."

Chast should know. The longtime New Yorker cartoonist is an only child and became the sole caretaker for her parents, George and Elizabeth Chast, when they reached old age. In her new, illustrated memoir — Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? — Chast mixes the humor with the heartache. It's about the last years of her parents' lives and her relationship with them as their child and conflicted caretaker.

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New York Times: At Home with Roz Chast

New York Times: At Home with Roz Chast

by Sarah Lyall

May 1, 2014

Parents Safely in the Closet
RIDGEFIELD, Conn. — By way of introducing her parents, Roz Chast opened her closet door and rummaged through some stuff on the floor. This is where she keeps them, amid miscellaneous boxes and general bedroom marginalia: her mother’s ashes in a maroon velvet pouch; her father’s in the Channel 13 tote bag he took with him everywhere.

“I like having my parents in my closet,” is how she explains it in her new graphic novel, “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?”, which chronicles the pair’s long, precipitous decline, starting from when her mother fell off a stepladder in 2005 to the time she died, in 2009 (Ms. Chast’s father died in the middle of all that). “I think it makes a nice home for them.”

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